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Freshly Made Mayonnaise

Introduction

I have taken a six month break from writing recipes, rather longer than anticipated. There has been so much to do here at Misse that I haven't had the distance and mental space needed to write. But now I am back, from rather nearer than outer space (h/t Gloria Gaynor), and I will be posting recipes and food pieces once or twice a week. Once I get a new content management system (CMS) up and running I may become more prolific. The CMS will save a lot of coding and make it easier for me to maintain this recipe site and its dependencies.

I thought Mayonnaise would be a fun recipe to ease myself back in. It's as easy as pie, but strikes fear into the hearts of many. Let's see if I can demystify some of that.

Tips

Everything used must be at at least room temperature and that includes the mustard and lemon juice or cider vinegar.

The best tip I ever got for making Mayonnaise was from Fanny and Johnnie Cradock. In their A Cook's Essential Alphabet, now long out of print, Johnnie mentions an occasion when Fanny left the mixer beating egg yolks so that she could answer the phone. The call was an important one, so she forgot all about the eggs and returned some considerable time later. She was met with a thick almost white batter. Hoping for the best she began to add the oil. The emulsion bit so hard that she began to pour the oil in, no matter it continued to emulsify. The result: perfect mayonnaise.

Don't use all olive oil, it's overpowering. Half olive oil and a neutral one such as sunflower or grapeseed works well. I prefer not to use olive oil at all unless I am making garlic mayonnaise.

You can use black pepper, but it will make your less mayonnaise less pretty.

Ingredients

Measures available: Metric  Imperial  U.S.

  • 2 fresh egg yolks
  • 250ml neutral oil such as sunflower or half sunflower half peanut oil
  • 1 tsp Dijon Mustard
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice or cider vinegar
  • Freshly ground white pepper and salt
  • 1 tbsp boiling water
  • 2 fresh egg yolks
  • 8 fl oz neutral oil such as sunflower or half sunflower half peanut oil
  • 1 tsp Dijon Mustard
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice or cider vinegar
  • Freshly ground white pepper and salt
  • 1 tbsp boiling water
  • 2 fresh egg yolks
  • 1 cup neutral oil such as grapeseed or half grapeseed half peanut/olive oil
  • 1 tsp Dijon Mustard
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice or cider vinegar
  • Freshly ground white pepper and salt
  • 1 tbsp boiling water

Tools of the Trade

  • An electric stand mixer with the whisk fitted
  • A squeezy bottle for the oil, so that you can pour it slowly and steadily

Method

Once again I must reiterate that all ingredients must be at room temperature or above. Warm the mixing bowl and dry it thoroughly.

Place the egg yolks into the mixing bowl and whisk them for at least five minutes on a medium to high setting; the resultant mixture should be pale and thick.

Add the mustard, a pinch of salt and a pinch of freshly ground white pepper and whisk for a further minute.

Keep the whisk turning at medium speed and start to drip oil into the mixture. Keep pouring the oil gently it should start to bind and thicken. Once all of the oil is amalgamated, add the lemon juice or vinegar and blend, then add the hot water. This last ingredient helps to stabilise the emulsion.

In the unlikely event that your mixture does not thicken but curdles or separates, pour the mixture into a clean jug. Clean out the mixing bowl and whisk repeat then start again by beating a single egg yolk (no need for further seasonings). Then drip feed the mixture from the jug until all of it has been blended. Add any remaining oil. Then proceed with the lemon juice or cider vinegar and hot water, as above.

This will keep in the refridgerator for 1-2 weeks but is unlikely to last that long.

Suggestion

For garlic mayonnaise add two crushed plump cloves of garlic at the same time as the mustard. It is worth using up to half olive oil with this mixture.

The quickest way to crush the garlic is to chop it finely, then grind it against your chopping surface with the flat of your kitchen knife and a little seasalt.