Patlican Salatasi - Aubergine\Eggplant dip

Filed under:

Patlican Salatasi - Aubergine\Eggplant Dip

Introduction

You don't come across this simple dish much outside of Turkey. It is lighter than Baba Ghanoush, it doesn't use tahini paste, and is more refreshing on the palette.

The Italian, Turkish, Chinese and Japanese aubergine\eggplant varieties, which are shiny and slender work best for this dish; bigger varieties tend to be too bitter.

Male eggplants contain fewer seeds, which also makes them less bitter. For information on how to sex an eggplant, no really, check out The Cook's Thesaurus.

Hummus

Hummus

Introduction

Found right across the Middle East with subtle enhancements and now around the globe with some bizarre varations, hummus is the ubiquitous dip.

The variations are natural enough. Without the addition of Tahini (sesame paste) humus would be a dull offering.

I have gone back to basics and include two variations that are natural extensions of the original. Feel free to experiment.

Cacik & Tzatziki

Cacik or Tzatziki

Introduction

There are variations on this recipe from the Mediterranean to Indonesia, but it is essentially a wonderfully cool combination of cucumber and yoghurt.

The difference between cacik and tzatziki is in the yoghurt. Greeks favour a strained sheep's milk yoghurt, which like Camembert or Champagne, should have its own AOC, as there is nothing quite like it. In Turkey, where you will find cacik served throughout the meal, a natural runny yoghurt is used, which can be very refreshing. The Turks also produce an iced yoghurt and cucumber soup of the same name.

Tapenade

Filed under:

Tapenade

Introduction

There have been olive pastes and concoctions around the mediterranean for centuries, but this dish is relatively recent. It was the invention of Chef Meynier of 'La Maison Dorée' in Marseilles and dates from the 1880s. My version uses a higher proportion of olives and includes lemon zest for added zing.

This will make approx 300ml, 10oz, 1¼ cups.

Syndicate content